Prescribed Fire Equipment

Drip Torch Use and Operation

Set up
Place torch on the ground and unscrew locking ring, then remove and secure flow plug from bottom of spout. Pull spout assembly out of torch body and allow excess fuel to drain back into torch. Place spout assembly in upright position on torch, with loop in spout on opposite side of handle. Place lock ring over spout and secure snugly on torch. Open air vent on top of torch by handle one turn. To store torch reverse steps once wick and spout has cooled significantly.

Operation
Grasp by the handle and tip the torch downward allowing fuel to flow over the wick. Allow a small amount of fuel to collect on the ground and ignite with match or lighter. Then place wick of torch in flames to ignite. To operate, tip downward and walk. To stop ignition, lift torch up.

Extinguishing
The flame can be extinguished by holding the torch upright and blowing or by covering the flame with the gloved hand, or a combination of both.

Safety
The person operating the drip torch should always be aware of their surroundings. Watch for other personnel and do not trap them with your fire. Do not get close to personnel with a lit torch and be careful around vehicles. A lit torch should always be carried upright when not lighting. The torch should never be taken outside the burn unit when lit. Torches should be extinguished if you stop lighting for any period of time. This helps save the wick and keeps the torch from becoming hot and not operating properly. When refueling torch, make sure to do so in an area off the active fireline and away from crowning trees and blowing embers.

E-1010 Oklahoma Prescribed Burning Handbook - Equipment - Drip Torch
The drip torch is a safe and effective tool for igniting prescribed fires.

Fuel Mix
Winter, Fall, and Spring = 50:50 diesel:gasoline,
Summer = 60:40 or 70:30 diesel:gasoline.

Handtools for Prescribed Burning

Shovel
Used for making firebreaks, suppression of fire in light fuels, covering smoldering debris with soil, mop-up or assisting with removal of stuck vehicle.

Fire Rake or McLeod
Used for making firebreaks, suppression of fire in light fuels and post burn mop-up.

Leaf Rake
Used for making firebreaks, suppression of fire in light fuels, and post burn mop-up. Works well in areas with surface rock.

Fire Broom
Used to suppress fire in light fuels and post burn mop-up.

Swatter
Used to suppress fire in light fuels and post burn mop-up.

Backpack pump
Used to lay wetline in places a pumper truck cannot get to, suppression of fire, follow up pumper trucks on escaped fires and post burn mop-up.

Leaf blower
Creates firebreaks in leaf litter, suppression of fire in light fuels, and post burn mop-up. Caution: make sure to blow embers back into blackened area.

E-1010 Oklahoma Prescribed Burning Handbook - Equipment - Common Handtools
Common handtools used on prescribed burns, from left to right: McLeod, leaf rake, fire rake, broom and swatter.
E-1010 Oklahoma Prescribed Burning Handbook - Equipment - Leaf Blower
Leaf blower being used to mop-up along the edge of the burn unit. Make sure to blow embers and debris back into the blackened area.